Tag Archives: Americana
Cedar Key – Florida’s Spare Key
It’s clam-tastic!

Cedar Key sits just off the coast in the northwest corner of the Gulf of Mexico, clear across the state from the well-known chain of islands down south.

The locals like to call it the “Island That Time Forgot,” and… CONTINUE READING >>

Sir, Yes Sur! Driving the California Coast

The images look unbelievable, but they are real and they are spectacular. This is Big Sur. 

Waves crashing against the craggy coast, mist drifting up mountains that rise abruptly from the sea, bridges impossibly clinging to cliffs…

A perfect day trip ending with elephant seals… CONTINUE READING >> 

Catalina Cart Blanche
Like the early Californian explorers, we approached Catalina by boat.

Steaming out of Long Beach Harbor past The Queen Mary, we were intrepid sailors in our air-conditioned, high-speed ferry complete with snack bar, lounge and cinematic classic on the big screen.

Arrrgh, the briny deep, matey.

Upon disembarking… CONTINUE READING >> 

Philadelphia, For Whom the (Liberty) Bell Tolls
Philly is truly the birthplace of our republic, this is where both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were deliberated and approved.

We felt it all around us, inch for inch this must be the most historic ground in America…. CONTINUE READING >>

A Patriotic Journey: Biking Washington DC’s National Mall

We were in a city like no other in America.

Or anywhere else for that matter.

We mounted our trusty wheeled steeds and headed out for a day of awe inspiring monuments and memorials. And we got to bust a few myths as well… CONTINUE READING >> 

Picture This: Union Station in Washington, DC

Union Station in Washington, DC is the most impressive depot we have ever traveled through.

From the bright shopping area around the gates, to the amazing, massive main hall almost one hundred feet high, the station left our left our jaws dropping.

The thirty-six… CONTINUE READING >>

America’s Founding Cities by Train, A Live Blog
In honor of National Train Day, we have joined with Amtrak to explore America’s great founding cities, Boston, Philadelphia, New York, and Washington DC.Obviously, we couldn’t possibly see all these in one day, so we will be stretching things out into a national train week… plus a day or two.

The train is the perfect transportation choice for our endeavor, since we will arrive right in the heart of each city at some of the country’s most… CONTINUE READING >>

Which Witch is Which? A True Salem Story

We fully admit we were drawn to Salem by its sordid past.

However, we were horrified to see that tourist trap economics trumped ugly, historical facts in Salem.

There are plenty of wonderful historical sites in the beautiful seaside town, including the famous… CONTINUE READING >>

Big, Big, BIG News! Going Gypsy and the Story of its Cover (you may judge the book by it)!
Remember that big news we’ve been spouting off about? The news we were afraid to talk about because we couldn’t believe it was actually happening?

Well here it is (drumroll please!):

We have a book coming out!

Can you imagine how hard this has been for over-sharing me to not say anything?

But, before we get into the details, I want to tell you the story about the cover.

Last December… CONTINUE READING >>

The Fiberglass Menagerie – the Mecca of Roadside Ginormous Stuff
Ever wonder where they came from? So did we! 

Nothing lifts the spirits while traveling through America quite like the sight of a fiberglass colossus looming in the distance. On a summertime roadtrip, through the shimmering heat from the highway, a form begins to take shape…

A sky-scraping Abe Lincoln, a Paul Bunyan the size of a small office building, a life-sized brontosaurus or a fish that could swallow an airliner — all have great power to inspire, or at least attract… CONTINUE READING >>

The World’s Shortest St. Patrick’s Day Parade
Where in the world is the most fun in the shortest distance on St. Patrick’s Day?

In a clever ploy to get us to visit, Veronica’s dad dropped a little “have you ever heard of The World’s Shortest St. Patrick’s Day Parade” on us early in in March.

How could we possibly resist an invitation like that? … CONTINUE READING >>

Canned Hammin’ it up at The Spam Museum!

A whole museum dedicated to a canned meat? Our wondering eyes had to see, we never pass up a cheesy tourist diversion.

Passing by the bronze pigs being led to slaughter, through the front doors, we were greeted by three thousand Spam cans stacked in a stunning display in the lobby.

This museum is no… CONTINUE READING >> 

How to Do Mardi Gras Without Being Asked to Lift Your Shirt!

Don’t get us wrong – we LOVE New Orleans. But the thought of wading into a Big Easy Mardi Gras is something better left to young whippersnappers.

We took the rural route and learned about the wonderful goings-on in Cajun Country – what they call the REAL Mardi Gras!

Courir de Mardi Gras involves costumed men dancing on horseback, begging, and chicken chasing!

La Grande Boucherie des Cajuns A tradition older than Mardi Gras, is a communal hog butcher and meat fest.

Fais do-do See what Cajuns do once the kids go to bed… CONTINUE READING >>

Mardi Gras Chicken Chasing


Chicken chasing, colorful costumes and dancing on horseback? It’s Courir de Mardi Gras in Church Point! You’ve gotta watch the video to believe it…it’s, well, just watch… CONTINUE READING >>

Underbrinks Bakery: A Visit with the “Nut Roll Nazi” of Quincy

Underbrink’s Bakery is a trip back to a simpler time when baked goods were made with care, by hand, from scratch and with really cool vintage equipment.

Owner and baker extraordinaire, LeRoy Rossmiller the self-proclaimed Nut Roll Nazi, maintains old fashioned ways. He showed us all of the inner workings while delivering a running commentary popping fresh with humor and sarcasm.

Since opening as a traditional German bakery in 1929, this little shop near… CONTINUE READING >> 

The Self-Proclaimed “Nut Roll Nazi” of Quincy


Meet LeRoy Rossmiller. It’s all in good fun (or is it?) Get verbally abused by the self-proclaimed “Nut Roll Nazi!”… CONTINUE READING >>

Traveling in Dr. King’s Footprints
Follow your GypsyNesters as we explore pivotal moments of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life though travel.

Join us in an emotional journey through Atlanta, Birmingham, Montgomery and Selma as we discover more about what had happened, what is happening now and our hope for the future… CONTINUE READING >>

The Civil Rights Memorial Center in Montgomery, Alabama


It was hard not to let anger be our overriding emotion. Tolerance and nonviolent resistance were the hallmarks of the movement, certainly we should carry on that tradition today. When adding her name to The Wall of Tolerance, Veronica was openly sobbing… CONTINUE READING >>

Florida Manatees: Where to Spot the Gentle Giants

November to March is the time to head to Florida for spectacular manatee sightings. 

These gentle giants head for warmer climates in the winter, much like their human snowbird counterparts. 

Here are our tips to having a manatee-filled getaway… CONTINUE READING >> 

Picture This: The Badlands of South Dakota

The Badlands of South Dakota
Out of nowhere, the South Dakota plains give way to The Badlands – layers of soft shale, clay and limestone that wear away at a rate of about an inch a year leaving stunning silhouettes and fanciful formations… CONTINUE READING > >

Singin’ the Blues Trail in Mississippi
Travel with your GypsyNesters as we roll down the Mississippi Blues Trail!

We discover the legend behind Robert Johnson selling his soul to the devil at the Crossroads, stay at the most unique inn we’ve ever seen – made of original sharecropper shacks, eat tamales – yup, there are tamales in The Delta – and BBQ, take on a Donut Tower, visit a REAL juke joint and the King Biscuit Radio Show and learn how The Blues influenced more modern music… CONTINUE READING >>

Shackin’ Up in Clarksdale


Clarksdale, Mississippi is home to one of the most unique inns we’ve ever encountered, The Shack Up Inn. This collection of sharecropper shacks on the old Hopson Plantation look like they haven’t been touched in decades, but inside… CONTINUE READING >>

Picture This: The Petrified Forest


When we heard forest, we expected large groups of upright trees. We felt kind of dumb. The petrified trees are all laying on the ground – alive with vibrant color – left there about 225 million years ago during the Late Triassic… CONTINUE READING >>

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